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Ruth DuCharme

Drop by Drop

Drop by Drop

by Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter April 25, 2019

Unlike my husband, I don't have one of those memories that easily retains numbers and dates. I don't do math well in my head, and if you tell me your phone number I will need to write it down, or it is lost on me. When I meet someone for the first time I have to associate their name with something in order to recall it later. That is just the way that my mind is wired. I need repetition and association to remember.

Trees and Trust

Trees and Trust

by Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter February 14, 2019

I spent many days of my childhood climbing trees. At the home where I grew up in Newnan, Georgia, there were three maple trees that crossed our front lawn. One particular maple tree was accessible to my young hands and legs. I could grab hold of its lowest branch and swing my legs up to hug the limb and then lift myself up into the tree. I would climb a little higher into the tree to a branch that was thick and strong. It could support my whole body, and I could lean against it almost like a chair just right for sitting and pondering. From the tree, I could view nests that the birds had made, and occasionally find a caterpillar’s cocoon. It was a place to explore and view life.

Where Will Christ Show Up?

Where Will Christ Show Up?

by Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter December 15, 2018

It’s Advent. It’s that time when we wait and prepare for the coming of the Christ child. In our waiting, we turn our attention to worship, celebrations, and preparations. By now we have strung lights, purchased and wrapped gifts, attended a few parties and concerts, and eaten our share of Christmas goodies.

What Do You Love?

What Do You Love?

By Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter July 26, 2018

I love God. I love my family and friends. Those are certainties in my life, and they are most likely certainties in your life. Beyond those true loves of your life, what do you love? What fills your life with joy and satisfies your hunger to be your true self?

I'll Weep When You Are Weeping

I'll Weep When You Are Weeping

By Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter, April 26, 2018

Do you remember a moment when you came to the realization that your life was not your own? For me, it occurred when our first child was born. We had this beautiful, healthy baby girl that we were crazy in love with, yet we were terrified of her at the same time. Caitlyn was totally dependent on Cass and me to meet her every need. We were her providers and protectors. We were responsible for her physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. There were moments when that realization overwhelmed me, and I questioned whether or not I was up for the task.

A Welcome Snow Day

A Welcome Snow Day

By Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter, January 25, 2018

It was as though our community was breathing a sigh of relief. That's what I heard and felt as snow began to fall over Macon recently. This southern girl loves a beautiful snowfall. It is a rare and beautiful event, which makes it a special occurrence—as long as the electricity stays on, and I am warm and comfy in my home. Snow in the south has us clinging to our televisions and social media, awaiting those sacred words, “school is canceled.”

I Won't Back Down

I Won't Back Down

By Ruth DuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter,October 20, 2017

Fall Saturdays at my house will find my family watching the Florida Gators play football. That’s what happens when you are married to a Florida boy who groomed his son to do the Gator chomp at the tender age of two.

Better Learn How to Kneel

Better Learn How to Kneel

By Ruth DuDuCharme

published in Family Matters eNewsletter, July 27, 2017

Our recent Highland Hills Pool Party could have been classified as a flop. About the time that we made our arrival at the Highlands Pool, the thunder started to rumble and the lifeguard blew her whistle signaling that it wasn’t safe to be in the pool.